September 2019

Drop-in Clinic

Tue, 10th Sep 201909:19:16

A drop-in vaccination clinic will operate in Queenstown 10/9 Tues

Lakes District Hospital

20 Douglas Street Frankton

3:30 – 8:00 pm

 

The clinic is for MMR vaccines for anyone who is unvaccinated or those older than four years old who have only had one vaccination. The clinic will not provide early vaccinations to children younger than 4 years old or 15 months old. The normal vaccination schedule of one MMR at 15 months and one MMR at 4 years should continue to be followed.

 

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Measles Update2

Thu, 5th Sep 201907:42:37

“ Measles situation”.

 

The measles outbreak has escalated in Queenstown. Public health & the Southern District Health Board are monitoring closely & responding as the situation evolves.

If you  are born before 1st January 1969 you are considered to be immune from previous infection.

After this date you will be fully immune if you had 2 MMR vaccines.

The current vaccination schedule gives these at 15 months & 4 years of age so children who have had all their age appropriate vaccines over 4 yrs will be covered. At this stage there is no indication to vaccinate children earlier than this unless they are a potential  contact of a Measles case,  or are going to Auckland or overseas where there is an established Measles outbreak. Adults who are uncertain about their vaccination status should contact the practice.

 

Clinical features of measles:

  • runny nose, cough, fever for 3 - 4 days before the onset of a generalised rash, starting on the head and neck
  • fever (at least 38ºC if measured) present at the time of rash onset
  • cough or runny nose or conjunctivitis or Koplik’s spots present at the time of rash onset
  • the case is infectious from the start of the prodrome (5 days before rash and 5 days after rash emergence).

If you feel you are a contact of Measles & have developed symptoms which you are worried may be  measles please contact your general practice. In general if you are at high risk you will be advised to stay at home isolated but we will give you information on that including if you need to present to the practice. If you have developed a rash & fever this will need to be confirmed by swab but please contact the practice & we will advise you how to go about doing this.

 

We will keep you informed as the situation progresses.

 

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Measles Update

Wed, 4th Sep 201910:32:09

Extract from the Southern District Health Board

 

Confirmed Measles cases in Queenstown

 

Key messages

 

MMR Vaccination

If you were born before 1969 you are assumed to be immune

 

For all others, if you have been fully immunised no further action is required.

 

Please refer to the Immunisation Advisory Centre link here https://www.immune.org.nz/hot-topic/measles-overseas-and-new-zealand for the most up to date vaccination advice from the Ministry of Health.

 

For families not travelling to Auckland or overseas country with measles outbreak

  • MMR vaccinations are to be given at 15 months and 4 years as per the Immunisation Schedule.

 

Families who are travelling to Auckland or overseas to a country with a measles outbreak

  • Infants aged 6 months to 11 months can have their first MMR (MMR0) (they will need to have the remaining MMR doses at 15 months and 4 years as per schedule).
  • Infants aged 12 – 14 months should receive all four 15 month vaccinations (MMR, varicella, Hib and PCV10) at least two weeks prior to travel.

 

 

Clinical features of measles:

  • runny nose, cough, fever for 3 - 4 days before the onset of a generalised maculopapular rash, starting on the head and neck
  • fever (at least 38ºC if measured) present at the time of rash onset
  • cough or coryza or conjunctivitis or Koplik’s spots present at the time of rash onset
  • the case is infectious from the start of the prodrome (5 days before rash and 5 days after rash emergence).

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